Calgary Board of Education

 
The World of Infection Control

September 28, 2011

A brand new start—and we are all excited and very enthusiastic at the CT Center! It was such an awesome experience to see our Cosmetology students so engaged with the National Educator, Monica Wartenburg, as she facilitated a dynamic Infection Control seminar on Monday, September, 2, 2011. Monica Wartenburg (National Educator in Advanced Foot Care-specializing in Infection Control Training and with 27 years aesthetic experience in Face/Body and Nutrition) wowed the students. According to Monica, "As a National Trainer, we are accountable for providing this industry with the latest technologies/chemistries for cleaning and disinfecting in accordance with Health Canada Standards. We work closely with the protocols set forth to ensure the well-being of all individuals working in the Cosmetology Industry and the consumers safety while providing the very best in professional care."

students learning
students learning

First of all, to be able to engage students, keep their interest and then have them excited about a subject area can be a real challenge. Monica made Infection Control so intriguing that they did incredibly well in their examination at the end of the seminar. The students who attended will all be receiving a Certificate for the Infection Control which will be great for their personal portfolios.

As the year begins, we are excited that students are blending traditional learning with the e-learning and are doing Work Safety and the Infection Control. One of the greatest responsibilities individuals in the Cosmetology Industry have is to protect client's health and safety, as well as their own.

Considering that the CT Centre is going to be offering the awesome pedicure experiences, we wanted Cosmetology students to be aware of the latest in Infection Control and some of the challenges facing the industry.

The highest levels of cleanliness and adherence to rigorous health standards are imperative to protect both the staff working in the salon/spa facility and the clientele. Controlling infection and disease is a vital and important aspect of the profession, which can be attained by consistently following certain guidelines and procedures.

With all the new viruses we need to make sure our disinfectants and procedures are adequate for sanitation, sterilization and disinfection.

New guidelines and regulations are considering enforcing a specific sink and area for Infection Control. In Canada, Federal Health regulations and the Provincial/Regional health authorities, with specific rules and regulations for Infection Control, set the standard for the industry.

man holding books and computer

Federal law also requires that manufacturers provide important information in the form of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), along with directions for proper use, safety precautions, and a list of active ingredients. The MSDS information on a product ranges from content and associated hazards to combustion levels and storage requirements. This vital information is available from the product's distributor and/or manufacturer.

What is a DIN # ?

A drug manufacturer must submit its new drug product to the federal government's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) at Health Canada for review and approval. The HPFB is responsible for approving a drug for sale and marketing anywhere in Canada.

The HPFB evaluates a product's safety and efficacy, and looks at a large volume of research including animal efficacy and toxicology studies. The federal review process can take between one and two years, depending on the nature of the product.

feet

Once Health Canada approves the product for sale in Canada, a Notice of Compliance (NOC) and a Drug Identification Number (DIN) for the product is issued.

At the CT Center, we are very proactive and want to ensure students know the latest information on products, knowledge, skills and process on Infection Control expectations by Health Canada today—not six months previous. We can then ensure the safety of students, staff and clients, which is of vital importance.

The consumer is driving the changes needed; consumers are tired of the dangerous health implications when having unprofessional services/treatments where they can pick up all kinds of fungi, viruses, bacteria, etc.

Guidelines have long been established by Health Canada for all Industries—Hospitals, Health Care Facilities, Swimming Pools, and Restaurants—including Spas & Salons. However, what was once considered acceptable for cleaning has now evolved to more stringent practices. More important, Health Canada, Virox and the CT Center staff and students work together to ensure complete safety and infection control protocols are being met.

One of the greatest responsibilities individuals in the Cosmetology Industry have is to protect client health and safety, as well as their own. In order to build a relationship based on trust and respect, Cosmetology students must learn and utilize the regulations, standards and rules in this hands-on profession.

The highest levels of cleanliness and adherence to rigorous health standards are imperative to protect both the staff working in the facility and the clientele. Controlling infection and disease is a vital and important aspect of this profession, which can be attained by consistently following certain guidelines and procedures.

It is imperative in this industry to ensure that students know and consistently apply Infection Control procedures/protocol every day in the CT Center so that instructors can market that particular aspect to valued clients.